Texting and driving

Some people manage to come up with ridiculous stories when under pressure. One woman, who had clearly crashed her vehicle into a sign, blamed the damage on her estranged husband. Tanya Taylor was texting and driving when she crashed into a yellow highway sign in Bennington, Vermont. When questioned by police, she said that her estranged husband had caused the shattered windshield, damage to the tires and imprint of a traffic sign on her hood. Luckily, nobody was hurt as a result of Taylor’s negligent texting and driving. She is facing charges of careless or negligent operation of a vehicle as well as leaving the scene of a crash with property damage.

Texting and driving is never, ever a good idea. Whether you’re sending a one word response or telling an elaborate story, don’t do it. A simple look at the statistics will show you why you should avoid a situation like Tanya Taylor’s and wait to send that text:

• More than 23% of car accidents involved cell phones in 2011.
• Each text message takes away at least 5 seconds of your attention from the road.
• Texting makes your chances of getting into a crash 23 times more likely.

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