mis·leadverb \ˌmis-ˈlēd\mis·led\-ˈled\mis·lead·ing

transitive verb: to lead in a wrong direction or into a mistaken action or belief often by deliberate deceit

The professions most commonly associated with being misleading are salesmen, politicians and, though I hate to admit it, lawyers, but I have witnessed more misleading behavior from insurance companies and their agents than you could imagine.

Just recently, Virginia personal injury lawyer, Ben Glass informed me of a case in which a victim in a serious personal injury case sustained such massive injuries a demand letter was not even necessary to get to insurance company to award him his full under-insured/ uninsured motorist insurance policy payout( $100,000). (If you know insurance companies you realize how unheard of that is). It is great that the insurance company was so cooperative until you realize that his case was so severe that he would have easily been awarded a $1,000,000 dollars if his limits had been set appropriately.

After speaking with Ben Glass the man looked into how much it would cost to have the $1,000,000 under-insured/ uninsured motorist insurance policy—the answer—a meager $7.49. Meaning, pocket change was the $900,000 difference. Because the insurance agent mislead the victim into thinking a $1,000,000 policy was an unnecessary extra amount on the policy the victim will have a much harder time dealing with his permanent injuries.

To ensure you do not suffer in this way at the hands of an underinsured or uninsured motorist, review your insurance policy and maximize your UM/UIM insurance limits. A few extra dollars can mean a difference of a $900,000 payout if you are involved in an accident.

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